American Teen - Movie Poster

American Teen

3.5 Anthony Macali

A documentary on seniors at a high school in a small Indiana town and their various cliques.

All the stereotypes are covered in this down-to-earth documentary, allowing every audience member to find a teen they can relate to. Our young protagonists are a mature lot, providing good material for the camera. As you could imagine, there is plenty of angst and drama, and while most of it is probably staged, it's still fun to experience vicariously. "American Teen" is ultimately about confronting new chapters in our lives, and is definitely worth a look.


Slumdog Millionaire - Movie Poster

Slumdog Millionaire

4.5 Anthony Macali

The story of how impoverished Indian teen Jamal Malik became a contestant on the Hindi version of "Who Wants to be A Millionaire?"

"Slumdog Millionaire" is a beautiful, almost epic story of love, struggle and money. The plot is tightly constructed, with Jamal reflecting on the vivid memories of his past - recollecting his life in the Indian slums - while answering questions on the show. High in emotion, and rife with tension, this film is both breathtaking and fascinating, an experience that will stay with you long after you leave the cinema.


Twilight - Movie Poster

Twilight

2.0 Andrew O'Dea

A teenage girl risks everything when she falls in love with a vampire.

"Twilight" is in essence a thinly veiled melodrama. The bulk of the film constitutes parading an endless procession of our star-crossed lovers staring longingly at each other, which achieves nothing but to reduce it to a lumbering bore. It feels like filler to a paper-thin plot, glaringly prevalent when crucial story revelations are uncovered simply by using an online search engine. An overwhelming sense of the anemic is coupled with dialogue that is as bland and as pale as the vampires' ridiculous skin. Appropriately put, this movie sucks.


High School Musical 3: Senior Year - Movie Poster

High School Musical 3: Senior Year

2.0 Anthony Macali

Troy and Gabriella struggle with the idea of being separated from one another as college approaches. Along with the rest of the crew, they stage a spring musical to address their fears about their future.

"High School Musical 3" might be better suited for the stage, but definitely not for the big screen. It feels like cameras were simply stationed in front of each performance, creating a dull and disappointing view considering the potential of cinema. The dance choreography is impressive, far superior to the songs that take too long to gather any momentum or vivacity. The climax is a simple re-hash of the film's earlier songs, and like my senior year, I couldn't wait for it to be over.


The Orphanage - Movie Poster

The Orphanage

4.0 Anthony Macali

A woman brings her family back to her childhood home, where she opens an orphanage for handicapped children. Before long, her son starts to communicate with an invisible new friend.

There aren't many things creepier than a house haunted by ghost children. In a scare climax, a medium channels the voices and cries of the sick orphans. It might be a little clichéd, but it's far from shallow. It also deals with grief and loss, themes supported by impressive performances. While the story lingers in these moments, the twists of the finalé forgive the build-up. A beautiful story of life and death, "The Orphanage" is a film not to be abandoned.


Dostana - Movie Poster

Dostana

3.0 Anthony Macali

When a landlady, to protect her sexy niece, turns down two young men eager to rent her apartment, they pretend to be gay.

Similar stories in Hollywood have produced deplorable fare, but how does the Bollywood version compare? Laughs are the same, elicited from the "obvious" humour in straight people playing gay stereotypes. The best scenes involve Sam's mother, who unintentionally becomes aware of his lifestyle change, a key scene that introduces the running themes of family and forgiveness. "Dostana" is superficial, but you will find it hard to resist its glamour and charm.


Australia - Movie Poster

Australia

3.5 Anthony Macali

Set in northern Australia before World War II, an English aristocrat who inherits a sprawling ranch reluctantly pacts with a stock-man in order to protect her new property from a takeover plot.

"Australia" reverently captures the culture of our land, from the quintessential outback "aussie" to the native spiritual Aboriginals. This is an ideal, albeit clichéd, backdrop for a romance to develop, and this relationship persistently takes centre stage, overshadowing the many sad events within the story. Ambitious in scope and venture, "Australia" is our country's patriotic film, and despite some underwhelming key scenes, is one to be proud of.


The Happening - Movie Poster

The Happening

1.0 Luke Bartter

When large amounts of people start inexplicably committing suicide in America, panic ensues.

The real disappointment about this movie stems from it's obvious lack of quality throughout. Other than a few intense scenes, it's dull and long-winded, so your curiosity runs out regardless of the unusual phenomenon. When you stop caring about the 'why' or even what happens to the characters, watching feels like a task. Tedious and lifeless, the most mysterious thing is how "The Happening" managed to get made into a feature film.


Mongol - Movie Poster

Mongol

4.5 Luke Bartter

The story recounts the early life of Genghis Khan who was a slave before going on to conquer half the world.

Epic in its scope, "Mongol" details the feuds and hardships Genghis Khan had to overcome in becoming a feared conqueror. Not an accurate historical account, but with great performances, music and cinematography, it's easy to forgive any liberties taken in the story. Replete with rousing battles and satisfying drama, even people who don't like subtitles should see Mongol. Violent, spectacular and moving. Highly recommended.


The Wackness - Movie Poster

The Wackness

3.5 Andrew O'Dea

A lonely teenager spends his last summer before university selling marijuana throughout New York City, trading it with his unorthodox psychotherapist for treatment.

"The Wackness" follows the empathetic character of social outcast and drug dealer Luke Shapiro, centering on the unlikely friendship he develops with his eccentric therapist, Dr. Squires. In each other they find a solace of sorts, sharing their parallel frustrations with life. This movie is entertaining in its strangeness, as it paints an almost sardonic humour through the juxtaposition of adolescent anxiety and middle-aged depression.


Choke - Movie Poster

Choke

3.0 Anthony Macali

A sex-addicted con-man pays for his mother's hospital bills by playing on the sympathies of those who rescue him from choking to death.

Victor Mancini is your atypical hero. Beneath a vivid sex addiction that thrives with perverse nudity is a man affectionate to his mother and seeking redemption from his self-destructive way of life. He also strives to identify his father, which leads to a bizarre and confusing set of events. It's this outlandish story that, complete with moral dilemmas and plot twists, heighten "Choke's" appeal, despite requiring your attention till the end.


Death Defying Acts - Movie Poster

Death Defying Acts

1.0 Luke Bartter

On a tour of Britain in 1926, Harry Houdini enters into a passionate affair with a psychic out to con the famous magician.

Despite "Death's" great cast and look, it is disappointingly unengaging and flat. The director might want you to think "what happens next?", but never answers the question "why should you care?". The detachment from the characters severs all tension and excitement, even making Houdini's stunts seem lacklustre. Not worth your time, unless you really want to make a donation to support local cinema. Not even Houdini himself could escape the mediocrity of this film.


The Counterfeiters - Movie Poster

The Counterfeiters

4.5 Andrew O'Dea

The Counterfeiters is the true story of the largest counterfeiting operation in history, set up by the Nazis in 1936.

"The Counterfeiters" presents a completely different sort of holocaust story. Saloman Sorowitz is captured and forced into a concentration camp to produce fake banknotes for the Nazi's. It challenges us through Saloman's quandary by raising provocative moral dilemmas. The movie doesn't impose a right or wrong, instead the viewer is subtly invited to ascertain their own beliefs. This brilliant film is surely no fraud, it's near enough a masterpiece.


Burn After Reading - Movie Poster

Burn After Reading

3.5 Andrew O'Dea

A disk containing the memoirs of a CIA agent ends up in the hands of two unscrupulous gym employees who attempt to sell it.

"Burn after Reading" is a wry, satirical comedy that revels in its own quirkiness. The outstanding performances convey a series of characters that haven't a clue what's going on - and neither do we - but therein lies the fun. The plot is as brilliant as it is convoluted. We don't see anything coming as each twist gathers momentum, creating a hilarious sense of the inconsequential. An absurdly entertaining film.


21 - Movie Poster

21

3.0 Anthony Macali

21 is the fact-based story about six MIT students who were trained to become experts in card counting and subsequently took Vegas casinos for millions in winnings.

This decidedly Hollywood account of the MIT Blackjack team is fair entertainment that will please gamblers and confuse others. After a slow setup we race through the rules of 21 and jet off to Las Vegas to enjoy the highs of bringing down the house. The movie can't maintain this level of fun, with its weak plot rising to the surface in a manufactured ending that feels contrived. Once you see past the flashy bright lights, you realise "21" isn't a big winner.


Sex and the City - Movie Poster

Sex and the City

3.0 Anthony Macali

The girls are back in town.

If the idea of watching 4 back-to-back episodes of "Sex and the City" sounds alluring, then you will love this. The length might be epic, but the pace is aligned with the TV show, maintaining all the fun, fashion and sex. We love spending time with these characters as they face some of the tougher challenges in life like marriage and divorce, a step above the usual frivolous banter of the series. On the other hand, if you're not a fan of our mid-forty heroinés, you will despise the glimpses into their lives. Fans of the show will find this film fabulous.


Body of Lies - Movie Poster

Body of Lies

3.5 Andrew O'Dea

Based on Washington Post columnist David Ignatius's 2007 novel about a CIA operative who uncovers a lead on a major terrorist leader suspected to be operating out of Jordan.

"Body of Lies" is a political thriller that presents a current perspective of the turmoil pertinent to the Middle East. Rather than descending into patriotic nonsense, it takes a pointed look behind the veil of the 'War on Terror'. Those with a vested interest in the often volatile yet delicate balance of diplomacy and international espionage will find this film intellectually engaging, while others may find the portion of action sequences, however impressive, lacking.


Smart People - Movie Poster

Smart People

3.0 Anthony Macali

Into the life of a widowed professor comes a new love and an unexpected visit from his brother.

"Smart People" is a comedy with a pretentious title, but enough wit to make it enjoyable. The film centres round a naive professor and how most of the people in his life loathe him. He falls in love with his nurse, a former student with an infatuation with the arrogant scholar that is questionable. It's the playful dynamics of his gifted family, and in particular, the sarcasm and rudeness of his daughter which are the most fun to watch. If only all those other issues didn't get in the way of spending time with this family. Interesting people, but not the smartest film.


Caramel - Movie Poster

Caramel

3.5 Anthony Macali

A romantic comedy centered on the daily lives of five Lebanese women living in Beirut.

It appears chick-flicks can transcend world boundaries. "Caramel" is time spent with friends - five women working in a salon, all trying to remove the issues in their lives. Such real-life problems we can relate to; from lust, romance, age, to daunting marriages. With genuine affection from the director's touch, we actually care about these characters, and enjoy their company, all the while adversely sympathising with them in the arduous scenes. This film is a refreshing sweet of cultural insight and winsome friends.


The Duchess - Movie Poster

The Duchess

3.5 Anthony Macali

A chronicle of the life of 18th century aristocrat Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire.

"The Duchess" is a window into the intriguing life of Georgiana, a view that overlooks her reputable politics in favour of her more lascivious endeavours. Extravagant romanticism flourishes in 1700's England, a time of manners, costumes and beauty. A significant contrast to the inner turmoil that dwells in the Duke's house, burdens of birthing a male heir exact many sacrifices. Outstanding performances portray the many troubled characters of this film, in a period drama that only suffers from an imbalance of love and politics.


Street Kings - Movie Poster

Street Kings

2.0 Anthony Macali

Tom is a veteran cop who finds life difficult to navigate after the death of his wife. When evidence implicates him in the execution of a fellow officer, he is forced to go up against the cop culture.

"Street Kings" is a dull, clichéd and terrible episode of life on the streets of LA. You have the African-American brother, the Mexicano Esé, the Korean Triad and the hard-boiled cops who always look out for each other and play the tough guy. The whole setup is embarrassing, with very mediocre and laughable dialogue, as well as unthreatening criminals who always end up helping the police. Filmed in a style where excessive grittiness is king, this is actually bad.


Son of Rambow - Movie Poster

Son of Rambow

3.0 Andrew O'Dea

Set in the early 80's, this is a comedy about friendship, faith and the weird business of growing up.

"Son of Rambow" is a quirky comedy that takes us on a nostalgia trip. It rekindles our sense of youthful exuberance as we're invited into the imaginations of a couple of schoolboys as they set about creating their own crude and amusing homemade 'Rambo' movie. Through their unlikely friendship we remember the ecstasy and difficulties of being a kid. Though the story lacks excitement in parts, and suffers prematurely from a relatively dull climax, lovers of heartfelt movies will find it very engaging.


The Diving Bell and the Butterfly - Movie Poster

The Diving Bell and the Butterfly

4.5 Anthony Macali

The true story of Elle editor Jean-Dominique Bauby who suffers a stroke and has to live with an almost totally paralyzed body; only his left eye isn't paralyzed.

"The Diving Bell and the Butterfly" is both a beautifully inspiring and tragic story. With clever use of the medium, the director throws us into the perspective of our unfortunate patient. Elle's cynical outlook provides more laughs than sympathy, as he serves his imprisonment and takes the opportunity to seek closure and follow his dreams - such a task our able-bodied selves often find too difficult. A wonderful film, and a celebration of life.


Persepolis - Movie Poster

Persepolis

5.0 Anthony Macali

Poignant coming-of-age story of a precocious and outspoken young Iranian girl that begins during the Islamic Revolution.

It's surprising how touching this black and white animation is. With sharp contours and pale gradients, the film looks astounding, but also portrays a "dark" period of Marjane's life. Her narrative provides earnest accounts of Iran's history, family and moving out of home; growing into an acute perspective of life in these times of revolution. You leave the cinema in a wake of colours, realising the splendour of freedom.


Vantage Point - Movie Poster

Vantage Point

3.0 Anthony Macali

With a Rashomon narrative style, the attempted assassination of the president is told from several different perspectives.

"Vantage Point" might seem interesting at first, with its "different points of view" storytelling, large ensemble cast and an American president. In truth, it's a bit repetitive and formulaic, with revelations only coming after we endure the assassination again and again. In the end, the bad guys die, there's a car chase to please all the confused viewers, and the story gets nicely wrapped up. Entertaining enough, but still annoying.