The Secret Diaries of Miss Anne Lister - Movie Poster

The Secret Diaries of Miss Anne Lister

3.5 Anne Murphy

In nineteenth century Yorkshire wealthy orphan Anne Lister lives with an aunt and uncle, anxious for her to marry well and blissfully, unaware that she is a lesbian.

An historic drama based on the real and extensive diaries of the protagonist. This film is rich with country mansions, beautiful costumes and staid English sensibilities. The highlight is a female lead that is steadfast in her beliefs, refusing to be totally repressed by the expectations of society, and determined to live by her own values. No doubt the secret diaries could reveal much more about this resolute woman who wanted a wife.


The Imitation Game - Movie Poster

The Imitation Game

3.5 Andrew O'Dea

During World War II, mathematician Alan Turing tries to crack the enigma code.

Part history lesson, part tragedy, "The Imitation Game" is a compelling biopic. This suspenseful drama reveals pieces of the puzzle slow and steady, with flashes of brilliance that unfortunately aren't sustained throughout. Nonetheless, with a constantly shifting chronology, it brings the remarkable legacy of the troubled mathematical genius to screen in an affecting portrait. The lead provides a sensitive portrayal in what is an empathy-stirring performance, outstanding in its awkwardness. An enigmatic man, cryptic and clever.


The Wackness - Movie Poster

The Wackness

3.5 Andrew O'Dea

A lonely teenager spends his last summer before university selling marijuana throughout New York City, trading it with his unorthodox psychotherapist for treatment.

"The Wackness" follows the empathetic character of social outcast and drug dealer Luke Shapiro, centering on the unlikely friendship he develops with his eccentric therapist, Dr. Squires. In each other they find a solace of sorts, sharing their parallel frustrations with life. This movie is entertaining in its strangeness, as it paints an almost sardonic humour through the juxtaposition of adolescent anxiety and middle-aged depression.


Shores of Hope - Movie Poster

Shores of Hope

3.5 Anne Murphy

Two friends working on the docks in East Germany in the 1980’s make plans to defect to the west.

Friendship, conscience, and politics from the last century make an engaging story, especially as everybody is plotting against somebody. The Stasi, the secret police, are portrayed as bumbling and brutal. It's alarming and intriguing to experience a world where betrayal is rewarded and nobody can be trusted. There is an austerity of style presented on-screen that lends credibility to the tale, and you may just pinch yourself in order to remember this is a story, although the setting was real.


Cloud Atlas - Movie Poster

Cloud Atlas

3.5 Andrew O'Dea

An exploration how the actions of individual lives impact one another in the past, present and future.

"Cloud Atlas" is a sprawling, thought-provoking film that explores the consequences of our actions, based upon the premise that the choices in one life will influence the next. The scope is epic; narratives are interwoven and re-visited as it spans the centuries and into the future, requiring an utmost attentiveness throughout. The sheer ambitiousness of this movie is sure to polarise. The audience will either be baffled and exasperated by such a layered and complex story, or thrilled by the mystery and profound emotional effect left on their philosophical compass.


The Company Men - Movie Poster

The Company Men

3.5 Wendy Slevison

Centres on a year in the life of three men trying to survive a round of corporate downsizing.

This movie is informed by the global financial crisis, which dramatically affected the world economy. Initially, the characters in the film are difficult to connect with. They are executives who earn big bucks and live the big life... until the crash comes, and along with it, radical changes to everything they have known and cherished, ultimately exposing the very core of who they are as men. The high quality of performance in this film evokes a surprising empathy and admiration, and you end up feeling that you have indeed been in good company.


Edge of Darkness - Movie Poster

Edge of Darkness

3.5 Wendy Slevison

As homicide detective Thomas Craven investigates the death of his activist daughter, he uncovers not only her secret life, but a corporate cover-up and government collusion.

Adapted from a popular British television series, "Edge of Darkness" showcases the leading man in his signature genre, the action thriller. Solidly produced, with strong performances and plenty of dramatic tension, most of the film is a satisfyingly intense ride. Unfortunately, the last section becomes somewhat chaotic, and the body count ridiculously high. A word of warning – the storyline is quite complex, so concentrate or you'll be left in the dark.


Liberal Arts - Movie Poster

Liberal Arts

3.5 Anthony Macali

When 30-something Jesse returns to college for a professor's retirement party, he meets Zibby, a young student.

"Liberal Arts" is an unassuming study of growing up, exploring the many fears and regrets that come with growing older. For most the part, the film is set within the grounds of a college, bringing with it a loaded sense of nostalgia. The quiet setting steers all the focus on loveable pair at the centre of the film, allowing them to share their stories at their own pace. Conversations are funny, charming and sure to resonate with our own. A delightful relationship to reflect on life.


The Bank Job - Movie Poster

The Bank Job

3.5 Anthony Macali

Based on the true story of the 1971 Baker Street bank robbery which was prevented from being told for over thirty years because of a Government gagging order.

"The Bank Job" spends little time on the planning and execution of the robbery, giving a false impression of the relative ease of the operation. The film's prize is investigating the ramifications of the heist, countless sensitive materials in the hands of common thieves caught in a very dangerous situation. Extortion, guns, cars, brothels, dodgy politicians, and the mob all play a part. A slow and erratic start pays off in the rewarding finalé.


Blindness - Movie Poster

Blindness

3.5 Wendy Slevison

A doctor's wife becomes the only person with the ability to see in a town where everyone is struck with a mysterious case of sudden blindness.

This allegorical film depicts societal collapse, triggered by mass loss of sight, accompanied by the descent into ugly degradation as people struggle against each other for survival. Filmed with a starkness that provides a sense of the white fog which precedes the blindness, and displaying a fiercely committed performance from the lead actress, this movie is a challenging experience which is certain to stimulate both thought and conversation afterwards.


Solanin - Movie Poster

Solanin

3.5 Anne Murphy

Recent college graduates try to fulfil their dreams in a band and escape the monotony of regular jobs.

A coming of age movie, where adolescents try to find a life beyond the conventional one that might be expected of them. The soundtrack is loud with original music which conveys the passion of band members; and in contrast, the dull and muted tones of Tokyo reflect the plight of those same characters. Well acted and understated, it is hard not to be moved by the sentimentality and uncertainty of lives dedicated to pursuing one's dreams.


Bernie - Movie Poster

Bernie

3.5 Thomas Jones

In small-town Texas, the local mortician strikes up a friendship with a wealthy widow, though when he kills her, he goes to great lengths to create the illusion that she's alive.

Bernie is just like that 'uncle' you suspect is using his goodness to suppress a dirty secret or fetish. You can't help but like him, but at the same time you're wondering if he's wearing lingerie under his suit. This mockumentary style tale is as much about the unlikeliest of friendships, as it is about the inhabitants of the deep south and their strict moral code. It’s their commentary as the events unfold that provide much of the comedy. So entertain'n you could butter my butt and call me a biscuit.


The Window  - Movie Poster

The Window

3.5 Anne Murphy

An ill and aged author has his housekeeper preparing for the visit of his estranged son.

Related as a simple tale, this film is a gently paced contemplation of life and death. Scenes are deftly painted with an aesthetic eye. The cinema screen becomes an artist's canvas coloured with the haze of summer and reminiscences. It is a rare pleasure for the audience to be credited with the intelligence to sketch sub-plots, rather than having it all spelled out. A melancholic but unsentimental study of mortality; pausing for a view through this window is recommended.


La Nostra Vita - Movie Poster

La Nostra Vita

3.5 Anne Murphy

When tragedy befalls a construction worker he leans on his boss to give him his own site to supervise.

"La Nostra Vita" shows a slice of life for a hard working and honest man in present day Italy. Everyday struggles to navigate dilemmas involving ethics, family and friends a system where corruption is rife and how difficult it can be to do the right thing. Filmed with a hand held camera, the choppiness of the screen images highlight the topical edginess of the story-line. The audience is propelled from moment to moment as the odds stack up against the lead good-guy. Astute, perceptive film making.


On the Road - Movie Poster

On the Road

3.5 Stefan Bugryn

Two aspiring young writers continuously take off across America to find 'it', and themselves.

"On the Road" effortlessly embodies the universal free spirit, and will tap into the inner adventurer in many people. The scripting is very literary, and it feels like it has been written more as a novel rather than a screenplay. The characters talk in an almost Shakespearean dialogue, and embody a Greek philosophical mindset. Their relationship with each other, and themselves, is very fleeting and empty, but thankfully, the gas tank is always full, and it’s interesting to sit in the passenger seat of their drug-fuelled ride across America.


Collaborator - Movie Poster

Collaborator

3.5 Anne Murphy

A playwright whose marriage and career are in a free fall has an explosive run-in with his former neighbour, a right-wing ex-con.

"Collaborator" is an intelligent movie with a slow fuse, the tension builds just a little more with almost every sentence spoken. This is a surprisingly gripping movie, as for the most part, the modest production is set in a lounge room. The familiar setting is loaded with socio-political comment as two estranged neighbours reflect on their shambolic lives. There are observations about relationships, growing up and thwarted ambition, leaving audiences much to think about. Guilty by association...


Weekend - Movie Poster

Weekend

3.5 Anne Murphy

Russell heads out to a gay club and picks up Glen just before closing time and what's expected to be just a one-night stand becomes something else, something special.

"Weekend" is a low key movie grounded in realism that presents a romance between two men who have only a weekend to spend together. The simple naturalistic style of this film is balanced by its emotional honesty. The performance from the two leads is genuine and understated, lending authenticity to this modest but deceptively intense exploration of falling in love. I've got Friday on my mind.


Paris, je t'aime - Movie Poster

Paris, je t'aime

3.5 Anthony Macali

Through the neighborhoods of Paris, love is veiled, revealed, imitated, sucked dry, reinvented and awakened.

It takes time to get accustomed to the vignette format of this film. As a result, the first stories will disappointingly finish too early. There are a few stories you will treasure (Bastille), some won't make any sense (Porte de Choisy), and some you would like to forget (Tour Eiffel). Nonetheless, you a get an true experience of falling in love with one another, and with Paris.


Creed - Movie Poster

Creed

3.5 Stefan Bugryn

The son of the late Apollo Creed encourages Rocky Balboa out of retirement to coach him into a championship fight.

This film is a solid piece of entertainment. No new ground broken, it works by sticking to the franchise’s tried-and-true formula, veering only slightly to explore one character's dynasty. Packing the biggest punch are the performances, which are genuine, and totally engrossing. Combined with a great traditional sports drama storyline, it introduces old characters to a new audience, whilst never abandoning the loyal fans. Not a knockout, but still puts up a good fight.


Mozart's Sister - Movie Poster

Mozart's Sister

3.5 Anthony Macali

Beginning in 1763, it follows the Mozart family's exhausting life on the road, traveling by coach from one royal court to the next.

"Mozart's Sister" is a beautiful film, mesmerising in picture and music. In a period of couture and candlelight, the Mozart siblings shine in their bewitching portrayals. For Nannerl, the message is very clear; women should not play violins, or compose. Such narrow-mindedness even causes our central character to dress as a boy at times. These examples of prejudice contribute to the film’s success, highlighting the frustrating loss of genius and talent to the hands of bigotry. This girl can play.


Elite Squad 2: The Enemy Within - Movie Poster

Elite Squad 2: The Enemy Within

3.5 Andrew O'Dea

A Lieutenant-Colonel in the military police force of Rio de Janeiro wages a war to vanquish the city of its drugs and corruption.

Set amongst the slums of Rio, "Elite Squad 2" is a fictionalised yet telling exploration of the harsh political reality in Brazil. A bloody and intelligent political thriller, the guns also blaze in a host of gritty but exceptionally realistic shoot-outs. Through a tale of violence, it highlights the exploitation of the poor to the corruption of the police and bureaucrats who are meant to be preventing the crime they profit from. Not quite elite, but a markedly solid effort nonetheless.


The Boys Are Back - Movie Poster

The Boys Are Back

3.5 Andrew O'Dea

A sports writer struggles with suddenly becoming a single parent in tragic circumstances.

"The Boys are Back" is a tale of fatherhood. A deeply moving meditation on life, death and the importance of family, the heart-wrenching opening sequence sets the tone for the film's sense of purpose that resonates throughout. Far from manufactured, it avoids being conveniently sentimental as it veers between moments of grief and humour. The cinematography is simply stunning, coupled by a beautifully melancholic soundtrack and sublime male-focussed performances that make this a movie for both boys and girls alike.


Fast Five - Movie Poster

Fast Five

3.5 Thomas Jones

Dominic and his crew find themselves on the wrong side of the law once again as they try to switch lanes between a ruthless drug lord and a relentless federal agent.

After watching this film, the drive home will feel slower than ever before and any muscles you thought you had will look more like excess skin. The cars and the men in this film put all to shame. The car chases and action sequences are non-stop, over the top, till you drop... and then some. The story, which follows a trio of crims on the run ties these amazingly shot scenes quite nicely together. If you have the need for speed, fasten your seatbelts.


Unbroken - Movie Poster

Unbroken

3.5 Anthony Macali

After a near-fatal plane crash in WWII, Olympian Louis Zamperini spends a harrowing 47 days in a raft with two fellow crewmen before he's caught by the Japanese navy.

"Unbroken" is a prisoner of war drama that shows the limits of how many beatings a single person can take. The camera is placed firmly in the thick of the action and lets the remarkable true story do the heavy-lifting, revealing an incredible, resilient man and his ever-constant fight for survival. Unsurprisingly, this film encompasses all the inspirational quotes accustomed to the genre, but thankfully these clichés don't overshadow the impact. Unrelenting.


Brothers - Movie Poster

Brothers

3.5 Anne Murphy

A young man comforts his older brother's wife and children after he goes missing in Afghanistan.

"Brothers" is as compelling as it is emotional, a powerful combination. As the title suggests, the focus is our most important relationships, the ones with family. The story navigates some difficult political and ethical terrain and is all the better for doing so without judgement. The audience is treated as intelligent, and almost everything is pared back except the strong performance from the entire cast. The overall tone and simple background setting are downplayed for realism, and the lingering memories are heart wrenching. He ain't heavy...