Harvest - Movie Poster

Harvest

3.5 Anne Murphy

Follows the relationship between two apprentices working on an agricultural complex south of Berlin.

A real farm setting and improvised dialogue provides "Harvest" with an almost documentary, naturalistic tone. The story is about two young men finding themselves and each other. Central to the film is a carefully observed and tentative romance in a potentially homophobic setting. The emotional tension and subsequent attraction between the two unfolds slowly. This movie enthrals its poetic depiction of emotional confusion and its surprisingly chaste approach to the developing relationship. Watch it and reap.


Hanna - Movie Poster

Hanna

3.5 Andrew O'Dea

A 16-year-old who was raised by her father to be the perfect assassin is dispatched on a mission across Europe, tracked by a ruthless intelligence agent and her operatives.

"Hanna" is a film that will divide action fans. Some will appreciate that this isn't your conventional assassin flick, as it straddles the line between art-house and mainstream cinema. Others will lament the lack of action as it takes the time to explore themes of family and coming-of-age. Although the fight and chase sequences might be sparse, they are each technically captivating, and enhanced by a brilliantly pulsating, almost hypnotic soundtrack. Surreal and wayward, but still hits the mark.


Wadjda - Movie Poster

Wadjda

3.5 Anne Murphy

An enterprising Saudi girl signs on for her school's Koran recitation competition as a way to raise the remaining funds she needs in order to buy the green bicycle that has captured her interest.

How women find their way in a patriarchal world underscores the story of a girl and her mother, written and directed by a woman. "Wadjda" shows life in a society where women face challenges and day-to-day struggles. There is a sense of defiance but it's diluted by resignation, and the result is a gentleness in the tone of the movie that's borne of a feminine viewpoint. Go girl.


About Elly - Movie Poster

About Elly

3.5 Wendy Slevison

A group of friends play matchmaker and a mess of seemingly innocuous deceits prove dire in their consequences.

"About Elly" is a rare and uncompromising glimpse into the lives of a group of Iranian friends on a brief seaside hiatus from their homes in Teheran. While the narrative revolves around Elly, it profoundly affects each of the other characters as they are exposed in various states of vulnerability. The austere backdrop of the Caspian Sea reflects the broiling emotion within the group as the plot relentlessly unfolds in this modest yet beautifully crafted film.


17 Again - Movie Poster

17 Again

3.5 Courtney Slevison

In 1989, Mike O'Donnell was the star of his high school basketball team. Now 20 years later, with his glory days behind him, a magical encounter gives him the chance to be 17 again.

In a familiar body-swap genre, this movie shines with charm and good-humour. The film is led by the brilliant casting of the main character, with a great supporting cast. While clearly aimed at teenage girls, "17 Again" will reach a broader audience due to its big heart and great comedic moments. The perfect film for undemanding, feel-good fun.


Trance - Movie Poster

Trance

3.5 Anthony Macali

An art auctioneer who has become mixed up with a group of criminals partners with a hypnotherapist in order to recover a lost painting.

"Trance" is a demonstration in the odd behaviours associated with art, hypnosis and love. What starts as an apparent heist film quickly transitions into a psychological thriller, challenging the audience to discover the truth. With each chapter, the story introduces new pieces of the puzzle and dissecting each revelation delivers a sense of accomplishment. Driven by a great cast of ensnaring characters, the only frustrating memory might be a plot-twist too many. A riveting piece missing perfection.


Knocked Up - Movie Poster

Knocked Up

3.5 Anthony Macali

For fun loving party animal Ben Stone, the last thing he ever expected was for his one night stand to show up on his doorstep eight weeks later to tell him she's pregnant.

A cocktail mix of crass jokes and baby sentimentality, "Knocked Up" is a surprisingly touching story that will leave you drunken with laughter. With a premise that is borderline believable, it introduces a unique perspective on birth, one not afraid to poke fun at all parts of the 40 week journey. It shows the miracle of birth, the trials of marriage and how fantastic, difficult and funny life can be.


The Housemaid - Movie Poster

The Housemaid

3.5 Anne Murphy

A man's affair with his family's housemaid leads to a dark consequences.

"The Housemaid" is an erotically charged study of the ruthless politics of gender and social position. Money provides the wherewithal to dispense with morality and it is replaced with malice so calculated it's breathtaking. Power is potently portrayed. The onscreen representation of the central family's elaborate lifestyle is lavish and visually opulent. The dark suspense builds and culminates in an ending that is disquieting and memorable, with an odd epilogue tacked on the end as a jarringly surreal close. Well maid, right up to the superfluous flourish of the finish.


Bridge of Spies - Movie Poster

Bridge of Spies

3.5 Anthony Macali

An American lawyer defending a Russian spy becomes part of a negotiation of prisoners.

"Bridge of Spies" begins as a curious courtroom drama, laying the foundations for a treacherous negotiation set against the Cold War, where intel and espionage rule. The period is remarkably recreated, the look and detail conveniently transporting us back in time, complete with particularly poignant scenes of the infamous Berlin Wall being erected. For a film that mostly takes place in embassies with officials drinking scotch behind closed doors, it's surprisingly engaging thanks to the fierce dialogue and air of tension. Bridge to a bygone era.


Forgetting Sarah Marshall - Movie Poster

Forgetting Sarah Marshall

3.5 Anthony Macali

Devastated Peter takes a Hawaii vacation in order to deal with recent break-up with his TV star girlfriend, Sarah. Little does he know Sarah's travelling to the same resort as her ex.

"Forgetting Sarah Marshall" is a delightful comedy filled with many interesting characters. The best parts are the small snippets that fall in-between scenes. These whimsical moments contain some of the best jokes, but also some welcome insights into our protagonists. The only disappointing bits are the undue vulgarity and contrivances towards the end. This film is a memorable mix of laugh-out-loud scenarios and genuine heartbreak.


Maps to the Stars - Movie Poster

Maps to the Stars

3.5 Anne Murphy

A tour into the heart of a Hollywood family chasing celebrity and the relentless ghosts of their pasts.

"Maps to the Stars" is a disturbing social satire that is also an absorbing study of human character, if you can bear to watch it. The bleak yet original story is gripping for the way it gradually unfolds without revealing what happens next. It's involving thanks to the strong cast who bring the reprehensible, self-absorbed characters to life. Everyone has self-destructive tendencies but the desperate violence they wreak on each other is what's most jaw-dropping. A dark night in Tinseltown.


Rachel Getting Married - Movie Poster

Rachel Getting Married

3.5 Anthony Macali

A young woman who has been in and out from rehab for the past 10 years returns home for the weekend for her sister's wedding.

Initially, this film is very difficult to watch. The story is high in emotion, and typically these feelings are not good ones, as we see a family worn out from Kym's drug addiction and its haunting consequences. Such sentiments swirl and evolve to the titular finale, reminding us of the everlasting joys in life. "Rachel Getting Married" is a powerfully poignant film that will affect you many days later.


Moneyball - Movie Poster

Moneyball

3.5 Andrew O'Dea

The story of Oakland A's general manager Billy Beane's successful attempt to put together a baseball club on a budget by employing computer-generated analysis to draft his players.

"Moneyball" is intelligent filmmaking that takes an unlikely subject and makes it interesting. It's a testament to the solid direction and brilliance of the scriptwriters that a story about the business of baseball could be so captivating. You can't help but be drawn in as it explores the opposing philosophies of intuition versus statistics, bolstered by that feel-good sentiment of rooting for the underdog. An entertaining movie that covers all the right bases, this one is right on the money.


The Twilight Saga: Eclipse - Movie Poster

The Twilight Saga: Eclipse

3.5 Anthony Macali

Bella is forced to choose between her love for vampire Edward and werewolf friend Jacob.

It is made abundantly clear that "Eclipse" is about decisions. It's hard to choose between the equally attractive (and buff) leads who continuously confess their undying love. Thankfully, this tiresome triangle doesn't consume the show. A great supporting cast share their interesting back-stories and shed light on the mystical history of vampires and werewolves, building tension for the frantic action showdown. Expect the inevitable lingering kisses amongst mountain tops and fields of flowers, but this instalment offers a little more to feast upon. Your choice.


Blessed - Movie Poster

Blessed

3.5 Anne Murphy

Seven lost children wander the night streets while their mothers await their return home.

"Blessed" pulls no punches as it explores a day in several corrugated relationships between mothers and their children. Melbourne is the gritty urban setting, effectively underscored by a pulsing soundtrack. For a film so set on portraying realism, it is surprising that some of the intertwined storylines stretch credibility beyond the boundary of believable. This is counterbalanced by a couple of stand-out performances that could wrench a still-beating heart right of your chest. Dead-beat, down-beat, cursed, cursing and blessed.


Fruitvale Station - Movie Poster

Fruitvale Station

3.5 Anthony Macali

The purportedly true story of 22-year-old Oscar Grant III on the last day of 2008.

Based on a true story, "Fruitvale Station" is the tragic chronicle of Oscar, and the frightful events of his New Year's celebration. A gritty style and clever mobile phone subtitles document the day with added authenticity, in a recollection where the characters admiringly take precedence over incident. Our protagonists aren't perfect, but their portrayals feel genuine, with a focus on family and relationships that add significant emotional weight, which becomes more apparent with the overwhelming sense of dread that arrives at the last stop. A great injustice.


American Gangster - Movie Poster

American Gangster

3.5 Anthony Macali

In 1970s America, a detective works to bring down the drug empire of a heroin kingpin.

"American Gangster" is an epic story of two people. Frank Lucas, a religious and devoted family man; and his polar opposite, Richie Roberts, the incorruptible cop, troubled at home but determined in his lonely pursuit. You can't help but take Frank's side, relishing his journey from rags to riches, and joining his vast corrupted network of cops and soldiers who succumb to greed. It's not until we see the effects of 'Blue Magic' that we're reminded his business is heroin. A brilliant and engaging crime classic.


Where the Wild Things Are - Movie Poster

Where the Wild Things Are

3.5 Andrew O'Dea

A disobedient little boy sent to bed without supper creates his own world inhabited by wild creatures.

This film is a strangely endearing adaptation of the literary classic. Though some may find the story languid at times, it's redeemed by spectacular cinematography and an almost despondent poetry. Brief moments of fun and frivolity are usurped by darker, more pensive undertones as we draw an emotional parallel between Max and the exquisitely realised 'Wild Things' that echo his feelings of loneliness, fear, and frustration... and it's to be admired for embracing this childhood angst rather than simply condemning it. Let the wild rumpus start!


August: Osage County - Movie Poster

August: Osage County

3.5 Anthony Macali

A look at the lives of the strong-willed women of the Weston family, whose paths have diverged until a family crisis brings them back to the Oklahoma house they grew up in.

"August: Osage County" plays host to a family steeped in unresolved issues. As each character is introduced, they bring extra weight to the drama. Based on a play, there are no small parts to this story, allowing each member of the ensemble to thrive, most memorably when they sit together in a dining scene to never forget. While the film lingers towards its conclusion, there's no doubt individuals will resonate identify with parts of the narrative before the end. Funny: Sad Family.


Purple Rain - Movie Poster

Purple Rain

3.5 Anne Murphy

The Kid is making his way as a performer with his band The Revolution, battling his inner demons and falling in love.

The screen belongs to the central performer of this film, and his music and moves are as mesmerising as is his mascara. Forget the barely there script and the stilted performances of the supporting cast, and allow yourself to be hypnotised by the singer - you know the one. There are a few too many macho aggressive moments that only serve to confirm the superficiality of the story-line, but all is redeemed by the leading man and his songs, the artist formerly known as Prince.


One Day - Movie Poster

One Day

3.5 Andrew O'Dea

After spending the night together on the night of their college graduation Dexter and Em are shown each year on the same date to see where they are in their lives.

"One Day" represents a promising move away from the fabricated, sickly modern trend of most romantic dramas. This movie poignantly captures the complexity of relationships and the way lives meander and inextricably change, bolstered by the terrific on-screen chemistry of our two leads. We enjoy the way they generate humour and warmth in the same way we appreciate how the film explores themes of love and loss. Whatever happens tomorrow, you'll always have today.


While We're Young - Movie Poster

While We're Young

3.5 Anne Murphy

A couple's career and marriage are overturned when a disarming young couple enters their lives.

A comic film with a sharp satirical edge, "While We're Young" takes a critical look at narcissism and self-obsession. In a sophisticated and adult way the story addresses the parts of us, which don't want to grow up. It is refreshing to see a mocking sort of message delivered without sarcasm, a welcome change from other more screwball offerings. The intergenerational humour allows us to recognise ourselves, whatever our age. Nobody wants to be middle aged, not while we're (feeling) young.


Behind the Candelabra - Movie Poster

Behind the Candelabra

3.5 Thomas Jones

The tempestuous relationship between Liberace and his (much younger) lover is recounted.

Surprisingly, for a film about a figure as flamboyant as Liberace, its a little dark. The central relationship spirals into some very odd and destructive behaviour; imagine your boyfriend wanting to adopt you as his son. From the fashions and furnishings, to the stigmas surrounding homosexuality, this film accurately captures the era with which it is set. Though at times it does become a bit farcical, there are award-worthy performances all round, particularly from the man who is the candelabra.


Little Miss Sunshine - Movie Poster

Little Miss Sunshine

3.5 Anthony Macali

A troubled family go on a road trip to enter their daughter into a Young Miss America Pageant.

This eclectic bunch faces all kinds of issues on their trip. From drugs and suicide, to homosexuality and death, all scenarios that will make you cry, make you cringe and most importantly make you laugh. It highlights the value of family and camaraderie, no matter how disturbing your family might be.


Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close - Movie Poster

Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close

3.5 Thomas Jones

A nine-year-old amateur inventor, Francophile, and pacifist searches New York City for the lock that matches a mysterious key left behind by his father, who died in the World Trade Center.

The centre of the world and its inhabitants, as seen and experienced through the eyes and mind of a young boy, are dynamically depicted in this film about loss and the journey one takes to feel found. The central plotline struggles to sustain your interest for the entirety and the loose ends could be tied quicker, but the moments where life and all its eccentricities are pulled back to a very literal and innocent place are quite compelling. All in all, extremely heartfelt, incredibly nice.